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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

3 edition of Nominal phrase in West African Pidgin English (Nigeria) found in the catalog.

Nominal phrase in West African Pidgin English (Nigeria)

Anthony O. Obilade

Nominal phrase in West African Pidgin English (Nigeria)

by Anthony O. Obilade

  • 111 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by cc1976. in Evanston, Ill .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pidgin English -- Nigeria,
  • Pidgin English -- Africa, Western

  • The Physical Object
    Pagination152 p.
    Number of Pages152
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20866222M

    Today Pidgin English, a language which has been passed on over the generations is still widely used as a market language in much of coastal West Africa (and not just in the Anglophone countries of West Africa, but in the Francophone ones as well (e.g. in . pidgin, and to compile a corpus of English-based pidgin words in circulation. The data used in this research reflect the linguistic backgrounds of the Nigerian people and also show how their languages help in constituting the word stock in English-based pidgin. From .

    The African Pidgin in the various countries of West Africa share similarities to the various dialects of English found in the Caribbean. Some of the returning descendants of slaves returned to the New World of West Africa with many words and phrases from the Jamaican Creole (also known as Jamaican Patois or Patois) and the other Creole. Cameroon Pidgin-English including a teaoh- ing manual and a glossary. The book is divided into chapters covering an introduction, phonology, morphology, function classes, phrase analy- sis, sentence analysis, a glossary, and Pidgin- English texts. Several appendices are included as well as a bibliography and an.

    Cameroon Pidgin English (CPE) is an English-lexified Atlantic expanded pidgin/creole spoken in some form by an estimated 50% of Cameroon’s population, primarily in the anglophone west regions, but also in urban centres throughout the country. Get this from a library! Some day been dey: west African pidgin folktales. [Loreto Todd] -- 'Once upon a time' is the English translation of the title of this collection of twenty-eight Pidgin tales from Cameroon in West Africa, first published in These are richly illustrative of the.


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Nominal phrase in West African Pidgin English (Nigeria) by Anthony O. Obilade Download PDF EPUB FB2

West African Pidgin English also known as Guinea Coast Creole English is a West African creole language lexified by pidgin English and local African languages. It originated as a language of commerce between British and African slave traders during the period of the Atlantic slave ofabout 75 million people in Nigeria, Cameroon, Ghana and Equatorial Language family: English Creole, Guinea.

Marchese, Lynell & Shnukal, Anna. Nigerian Pidgin English of Warri. Journal of the Linguistic Association of Nigeria 1. – Obilade, Tony.

The nominal phrase in West African Pidgin English (Nigeria). Northwestern University Doctoral dissertation. Ofuani, Ogo A. On the problem of time and tense in Nigerian Pidgin.

Nigerian Pidgin is an English-based pidgin and creole language spoken as a lingua franca across language is sometimes referred to as "Pijin" or Broken (pronounced "Brokun").It can be spoken as a pidgin, a creole, slang or a decreolised acrolect by different speakers, who may switch between these forms depending on the social setting.

A common ISO pcm. Pidgin is an English-based creole language and Nigeria’s real lingua franca. English might be the official language, but in a country with well over other local languages, Pidgin was developed to aid communication among people from different parts of the country, as well as between locals and Europeans.

These slaves, who spoke different African languages, invented a form of English, West African Pidgin English, which incorporated many features from West African languages. Gullah could survive because it was relatively self-contained and isolated from the rest of the world." (Zoltán Kövecses, American English: An Introduction.

Broadview. West African Pidgin began in the late 17th and 18th centuries as a simple trade language between Europeans and Africans. Combining basic nautical English vocabulary (itself derived from regional.

Pidgin borrows words from indigenous languages and English. For instance, ‘Walahi’ is a Hausa word that means ‘sincerely or truthfully’.

‘Koro’ is borrowed from Isoko while ‘Lungu’ is Hausa; meaning ‘short cut’, ‘dark alley’ or ‘dirt road’ depending on the context it is used in. The papers in this volume fall under two main themes.

The first deals broadly with multilingualism and language contact in West Africa in general and Cameroon in particular. Important topics discussed in this section include: the structure and discursive use(s) of the various forms and uses of Pidgin English, the ways the French language and African languages have.

Nigerian /Ghanaian/ West African English One of the more surprising things about Nigerian English is the extent to which it has a common lexicon and grammar with other West African Englishes, notably Ghanaian.

A guide to Ghanaian English (Kirby ) provides an interesting comparison with the present document and parallel forms are noted2. The differences between the two lie in the domains of word order, the determiner system, Tense, Mood, and Aspect markers, sentential and relativized complementation.

To provide a couple of illustrative examples, the original Hawaiian Pidgin displayed variable and unstable word order due in part to speakers’ L1 influencing the word order they. nominal phrase in West African Pidgin English, uses Halliday’s systemic model to explain the various meanings expressed in the nominal phrase and how they are given grammatical expression.

He defines the nominal phrase in terms of its constituents (modifiers, head, and qualifiers) and in terms of a higher unit, the clause (where in the. In West Africa, English pidgins and creoles are found from the Gambia in the northwest to Cameroon in the southeast (Holm ).

The term ‘West African Pidgin English’ (WAPE) has been used in the literature to refer to a variety of related pidgins ‘that range from rudimentary to highly expanded, creole like. The BBC World Service’s radio service of English-based Pidgin for West and Central Africa, BBC News Pidgin, is now a year it’s thriving.

According to the broadcaster it News Pidgin. In West Africa, pidgin was accepted as the de-facto language of blue collar trade and merchants.

In some West African countries, the trappings of the contact with Europeans promoted the use of pidgin and relegated the status of indigenous languages. Holm () reveals that because of its nationwide currency, English-based. 1 Introduction. Cameroon Pidgin English (cpe) is an Atlantic expanded pidgin/creole spoken in some form by an estimated 50% of Cameroon’s 22, population, primarily in the Anglophone west regions, but also in urban centres throughout the country (Lewis et al., ).This paper addresses the following specific research questions within the context.

Vocabulary was even taken from latin language. For example the german word "Fenster" (window) was taken from latin "fenestra". So maybe some hundred years in the future pidgin will be a modern west african language, with historical roots in english and elements of a lot of native african languages.

This paper is a linguistic analysis of proverbs in Cameroon Pidgin English (CPE), a variant of West African Pidgins spoken along the West Coast of Africa from Ghana down to Cameroon. It is a language that came into being in Cameroon during the Slave Trade years (), and it was the only language in which Slave traders and the indigenes.

West African Pidgin English Joey Hurst, John Woodard & Olivia Windmill Methods for forming words Examples: English The man's wife The child's toy Third Person Singular 'S' Pro-drop No Possesive Forms Reduplication of Nouns & Verbs WAfPE The man wife The child toy phrases.

West African Pidgin English is a West African creole (hybrid) language based on pidgin (simplified) English and local African languages. It originated as a language of commerce between British and African slave traders during the period of the Atlantic slave ofabout 75 million people in Nigeria, Cameroon, Ghana and Equatorial Guinea use the language.

West African Pidgin English, also called Guinea Coast Creole English, was the lingua franca, or language of commerce, spoken along the West African coast during the period of the Atlantic slave h slave merchants and local African traders developed this language in the coastal areas in order to facilitate their commercial exchanges, but it quickly spread up the.

Download the Gospel of John in Pidgin English here. Sample text: GOSPEL WEY JON RITE JON CHAPTA 1 How God Word Com Mit Us 1 From wen taim bigin na im di word dey, and di word dey wit God, and God kpa kpa Imsef na im bi di word. 2 Di word dey wit God from wen taim bigin.The Atlas presents full colour maps of the distribution among the pidgins and creoles of structural linguistic features drawn from their phonology, syntax, morphology, and lexicons.

In addition there are some maps with relevant sociolinguistic features. The languages include pidgins, creoles, and other contact languages based on English, Dutch, Portuguese, Spanish.

For example, he said, “In a great many of the West African languages, as in Gullah, there is no distinction of voice” (). He gave an example to illustrate this: “instead of saying He was beaten, the Gullah speaker says, dem bit am, ‘They beat him’.” That is exactly how it would be said in Nigerian (or West African) Pidgin English.